50+ Summer Reading Recommendations

Have you seen the #KidsNeedBooks movement? It was a small gesture that turned into a Twitter hashtag movement by author Ann Braden. A number of authors have jumped on board giving away free stacks of their books to teachers so that they can, in turn, give them to students for reading over the summer. The heart of this movement is to help kids avoid the summer slide.

Booksource, an educator’s best friend in the book department, has also been tweeting about how to help students enjoy summer reading and avoid the summer slide. Their infographic that explains how to stop summer slide inspired me to write this post.  Based on student reading personality, we’ve put together a list with links to their Amazon page. Please know that some of these links are affiliate links, and if you choose to make a purchase we will be compensated at no extra cost to you. 

Find middle and high school titles to suggest for summer reading

As a career-long middle school teacher, and wanting to incorporate some high school titles, I asked my friend Melissa Kruse from Reading and Writing Haven to help curate this list of titles. With our own students in mind, we created each category based on popular book choosing habits. Any of the titles that are meant for a more mature audience have an (HS). We hope your students, or children, enjoy their summer of reading!

For the student….

Summer Reading Slide Booksource InfographicWho has read EVERY book on the shelf

Who says he/she “hates” reading

Who likes a visual

Who likes their plots twisty

Who likes a good belly laugh and ugly cry

Who wants to go on an adventure

Who wants to figure out “who done it”

Who likes a happy ending

Who wants to travel back in time

Who wants to join a revolution

Who likes their characters out of this world

Who always has a good joke

Who saw the movie first

Who needs to see the relevance

Who is a mathematician

Who loves science

Who enjoys art and music

Who is an athlete

Who wants to be in the military

Who is “outdoorsy”

Who likes apocalyptic fiction

Who has always wanted to live in a castle

Who enjoys Christian lit

Who needs pictures to stay engaged

Reading over the summer is imperative for students’ development. Teachers can partner with parents to increase the likelihood that it will happen. Send home this recommended reading list and a few tips for how parents can help students enjoy reading. Teachers can also take students to the library so that they can browse the shelves and create their own summer reading list.

If you’d like tips on how to create more of a literacy culture in your classroom, read Melissa’s post on how to run a classroom book club. For a set of FREE Notice and Note annotation bookmarks and other great resources join the TeachMomRepeat newsletter.

Help add to our list of summer reading novels in the comments! What book is always checked out in your classroom? What book did you teen talk about endlessly?

Reading and Writing Haven

 

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